Botanical Survey of India | Flora of India

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Baccaurea ramiflora Lour., Fl. Cochinch. 661. 1790. Pierardia sapida Roxb. [Hort. Bengal. 28. 1814, nom. nud.] Fl. Ind., ed. Carey 3: 254. 1832. Baccaurea sapida (Roxb.) Müll.Arg. in DC., Prodr. 15(2): 459. 1866 (p. p. excl. syn. B. microstachya); Hook.f., Fl. Brit. India 5: 371. 1887, p. p.; C.E.Parkinson, Forest Fl. Andaman Isl. 239. 1923; Kanjilal et al., Fl. Assam 4: 161. 1940.


Abor.: Bureh; Asm.: Leteku, Latok-tenga; Beng.: Latka, Kusum-tenga; Cach.: Kusmariphang; Garo.: Kojuka; Hindi: Khattaphal; Kh.: Dieng-soh-ramding; Lep.: Sambhyo-kung, Sumbling; Lush.: Pangkai; Manip.: Moktok; Mik.: Dampiya-arong; Nep.: Kusum; Sylh.: Bhubi; Tripura: Bhubi, Iphek.

Trees, 3 - 15 m tall. Leaves cuneate-obovate to elliptic-obovate or elliptic to oblongelliptic, acute to obtuse at base, entire to repand-denticulate along margins, acuminate at apex, 8 - 34 x 3 - 10 cm, coriaceous, glabrous above, glabrous or often with sparsely pubescent midrib beneath, sometimes glossy; lateral nerves 5 - 9 pairs; petioles 2 - 8 cm long; stipules lanceolate, 4 – 6 mm long, caducous. Male inflorescences on older branches and trunks, fascicled, 4 - 12 cm long; bracts lanceolate to linear, 1 – 1.5 mm long; pedicels 1 - 3 mm long; stamens 4 - 8, ca 0.8 mm long. Female inflorescences cauli- or ramiflorous, few together, 15 - 30 cm long, pendulous; bracts lanceolate, 2 – 6 mm long; pedicels 1 - 3 mm long; sepals 4 or 5, broadly oblong-elliptic or spathulate, 2 - 4 (-6) x 1 - 2 mm, densely papillose-puberulous; ovary subglobose or ovoid, 1.5 - 2 mm in diam., 3-locular, sericeous or velutinous; stigmas 3, discoid or flabellate, ca 5 mm broad. Fruits globose, broadly ovoid or ellipsoid, 20 - 35 x 15 - 35 mm, 3-locular, thick-walled, yellow when ripe, verrucose or often smooth, sparsely puberulous, tardily dehiscent; pedicels 2 - 6 mm long.

Fl. Dec. - May; Fr. March - Aug.

Distrib. India: Subtropical forests, wet evergreen forests, inland forests, from sea level up to 1200 m altitude. West Bengal, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Tripura, Orissa and Andaman Islands.

Bhutan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, China, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand and Malay Peninsula.

Uses. The fruits are sour and very tasty, eaten with relish in Andaman Islands. Often cultivated for the edible fruits, which finds use in preparation of wine. Mikirs of NE. India use the juice of the fresh bark in constipation. . Bark used as a mordant for dyeing clothes in Bhutan. For details about the chemistry of the bark and fruits, see Wealth of India, 1988.

Notes. Chromosome number: n: 13 (Hans, Taxon 22: 609. 1973).





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